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Photo by Brendan Hoffman / Visitors pose for pictures with border guards following the extravagant daily border closing ceremony at the Wagah border crossing between Pakistan and India, which draws large crowds on both sides for a nationalistic display and the cultivation of patriotic pride. Water issues in the Indus River Basin spanning the two countries are inextricably bound up in politics. Disputes since 1960 have been governed by the Indus Waters Treaty, a document that has survived several wars and probably prevented several others. Still, tensions between the countries remain high, with water rights playing no small part. Follow me for more human stories from around the world. #wagahborder #punjab #pakistan Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
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Photo by / This is a portrait of Keyt and her partner on Brighton Beach in Brooklyn. Keyt is a taxi driver who I met on the beach and have photographed many times over the past few years. The couple is part of the Russian community in Brighton Beach.
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Photo by / Blue moon setting over Walden Pond. In case you didn’t know, a blue moon refers to the second full moon in a single calendar month, and I photographed this one on October 31, just before sunrise, as the moon set over the trees after our first snowfall in Massachusetts. Since the water in the pond was still well above freezing, a mist rose on this cold morning, creating a wonderful atmosphere. Walden Pond is just five miles from where I live, and documenting nature there through the seasons has been a long-term personal project. What’s amazing is that even after many years, I can still come across scenes that are completely new, like this one. I find it inspirational, just as Henry David Thoreau did years ago, I guess. You can see more of my collection from Walden Pond . #WaldenPond #NewEngland #BlueMoon #Concord #Massachusetts
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Photo by / A mobile scout team with Northern Rangelands Trust () patrols for poachers in northern Kenya. The patrols look and act like an infantry unit; dog handlers use bloodhounds to track poachers. "It's a war we are fighting," Sergeant Kariuki said. "And information is everything." With the pandemic, their work has become more critical, just as funding has become more elusive—tourism has vanished. The threat to their livelihoods and to nature grows ever greater. All over Africa, conservationists have reported an increase in illegal bushmeat hunting, and they fear organized poaching of rhino horn and ivory could be next. Learn more, including how to help, by following and . .for.good #kenya #conservation #rhinos #africa
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Photo by / Over the last year, we’ve been exploring what might be the very first love songs that we hear: lullabies. We wanted to find out what bedtime looked and sounded like for families around the world. Christiana and Ori are seen at home in West Point, Liberia. Christiana was a teenager when she gave birth to her first child, and she was sent away by her parents when they found out about her pregnancy. Here, she’s seen with her second child, Ori in their room—the first roof over her head after years of spending bedtime in the streets. "I will never give up. After a while, my change will come," she sings. We think of lullabies as simple, soothing songs that help put children to sleep, but they also reveal so much about caregivers. Read—and listen to—our story on lullabies, in this month’s issue of Nat Geo, with audio by Rupert Compston. Follow me as we journey exploring nighttime rituals around the world. #livinglullabies #Liberia . Join me and my editor as we present this project and discuss this story on the virtual Nat Geo Live stage today, December 3, at 7-8 p.m. EST. Register for free at the link in bio.
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Photo by / At Nalukataq, the Iñupiaq whaling festival, the village of Utqiagvik Alaska, comes out to celebrate a fruitful whaling season and to give thanks to the whale for its gift. Here, successful whalers must do the blanket toss. They are thrown up to 30 feet (10m) in the air, and depend on everyone's hands to land safely. This trust goes back millennia, and ensures intimacy among the population in Iñupiaq villages. Follow me for more from the Indigenous world. #Alaska #arctic #inuit
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Photos by / I’ve been on the road documenting the run-up to the U.S. election. Along the way, I met Glenn Spencer, 83, at the border wall near Sierra Vista, Arizona. Spencer, a retired systems engineer, is a self-proclaimed guardian of the U.S./Mexico border. He’s devoted a quarter century of his life to stopping illegal migrants, believing he has more effective tools than what he calls the "gimmick" of President's Trump’s border wall. He developed a surveillance system that uses technology from the oil industry, connecting seismic sensors to monitor movements in the area. #arizona #drone #borderwall #usmexicoborder #immigration
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Photo by / Historically nine species of Partula snails could be found on the South Pacific island of Tahiti. Sadly, three are now extinct, and a fourth species, Partula nodosa, pictured here , is believed to be extinct in the wild. When the French Polynesian government allowed the importation of African land snails to Tahiti, little was known about their impact. Soon after introduction, African land snails began eating local crops; to solve this problem, another predatory snail was brought to the island. But instead of eating the African snails, the newcomers ate the Partula snails, leading to their decline. Fortunately, some Partula snails survive in zoos, where they are being bred with the hope that they can be returned to their native island. To see more species featured in the Photo Ark, follow me . #PhotoArk #savetogether
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Photos by Keith Ladzinski / Invasive Asian carp breach; they're being collected along the Illinois River, about nine miles south of Lake Michigan. Invasive species in the United States cost the country an estimate 137 billion dollars a year in both management and damage. Asian carp management alone costs an estimated $7 billion, according the Department of Fish and Wildlife. From electric barriers to nearly year-round fishing efforts by the DFW and contracted "carp cowboys," serious work is being being done to keep these fish out of Lake Michigan. Asian carp are incredibly damaging to native fish populations in lakes and rivers because they outcompete other fish for both food and space. If they enter Lake Michigan it could overrun the fish stocks. They were intentionally introduced to help with algae blooms and a variety of aquatic vegetation considered problematic in agriculture. The people that introduced them had no idea what a problem it would eventually become. The fish seen here are taken to pet food facilities for processing. Photographed on assignment for the Great Lakes December issue cover story for . Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
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Photo by / An Amish family gets caught in a thunderstorm after getting off a 24-hour bus ride, from Ohio to Sarasota, Florida. Most people don’t associate the Amish and Mennonites with leisure, but every winter Amish and Mennonite families from all around the U.S. flock to Pinecraft, an area in Sarasota, Florida, for vacation. The small neighborhood, encompassing about 10 blocks, transforms into an “Amish snowbird capitol,” where different denominations of Anabaptists escape the winter together and mingle among each other. The usual rules are a bit looser, as a blind eye is turned to the use of cell phones, cameras, and bicycles and recreational activities encouraged. For more images, follow me .
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Photo by / This is just outside Bunia, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a place of incredible beauty as well as conflict—it lies near the center of the ongoing Ituri struggle between the Lendu and Hema peoples. Long-dormant land disputes between Hema herders and Lendu farmers were re-ignited in December 2017, resulting in a surge of massacres—with entire Hema villages razed and over a hundred casualties. Tens of thousands fled to Uganda. While the massacres by Lendu militia ceased in March 2018, crop destruction, kidnappings, and killings continued. The UN estimated that as many as 120 Hema villages were attacked by Lendu militia from December 2017 through August 2018. Follow for more human stories from around the world.
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Photo by / Clouds rising from one of the world's largest geothermal power plants in Iceland are formed by steam emanating from the heart of a volcano. Intense volcanic activity allowed Iceland to expand its reliance on geothermal power for heating and energy production, and today almost all of Iceland's electricity is produced from renewable sources. Iceland's approach is a subject in my latest story for National Geographic magazine called "The End of Trash." It's about the circular economy surfacing as a promising solution to waste, pollution, and emissions. By designing waste out of the production system, circularity aims to keep resources and materials in use while regenerating natural systems. While a circular economy is promising, it is only one of the tools that may help turn our collective situation around. The truth is there isn't one single solution, yet each one of us can make a difference through more purposeful living and staying informed. Please follow me to learn how we can make a difference in the pressing issues facing our planet. #environment #circulareconomy #geothermal #iceland #lucalocatelliphoto Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
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Photo by Prasenjeet Yadav .yadav / Jing KiengJri is a local name for these fascinating living root bridges, and the one you see in the picture is famously known as the double-decker bridge. Found in the northeastern India's Meghalaya State, these bridges are located in the foothills of the Himalaya. These bridges are a force of nature and human ingenuity, and I was humbled to learn about these intertwined root structures from people whose ancestors crafted them. To tell their story, we needed to show these living structures in a new light. After brainstorming with my photographer friend and lighting inspiration , we decided to make light painting the primary way to make nighttime portraits of these tree bridges. The idea was to use artificial lighting to isolate the big green bridges from their never-ending green rainforest background. Artificially lighting these humongous Ficus elastica trees was tricky and challenging. But after weeks of trying, the resulting images were close to what we had in mind: to make them look like they're right out of Lord of the Rings. Follow me .yadav for more photos from biodiverse India.
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Photos by / The adoration with which this emperor penguin parent regards its chick is a warmth unmatched on Antarctica's raw sea ice. Males incubate eggs for two months in -40℃ (-40℉) weather without a single meal, losing 30% of their body weight in the process–a display of utter commitment. These penguins have no say, no power, and no understanding of the climate nosedive humanity has instigated but suffer all the consequences. Follow me as we work to renew our species' commitment to being good stewards for the planet and all who reside here. #penguin #emperorpenguin #chick #antarctica #parent
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Photo by / A stop sign of Red Rocks Park and Amphitheater, an open-air venue carved from rock outside Denver, Colorado.