natgeo
Photo by Muhammed Muheisen / I don’t just pass by and take pictures and leave; I spend time, I invest, I get to know the people, gain their trust and respect, and aim to make a difference with my pictures, big or small. I'm a founder of the foundation, where through photography we manage to make a difference. For over a decade, I've been documenting the refugee crisis. Today, on the occasion of World Refugee Day, which is dedicated to raising awareness of the plight of refugees throughout the world, I'll be sharing images of a very special story about a young Syrian refugee girl, Zahra Mahmoud. In this picture from 2018, Zahra stands at her family’s tent in a settlement on the outskirts of Mafraq in Jordan. For more photos and videos of the refugee crisis, follow me . For more on how to get involved, follow . #MuhammedMuheisen #EverydayRefugees #WorldRefugeeDay
natgeo
Photo by Muhammed Muheisen / Zahra Mahmoud and her elder sister Fatimah are Syrian refugees from Deir ez-Zor. I first met Zahra in August 2015, when she was four, in a tented settlement in Jordan where she and her parents took shelter. Since then I have repeatedly visited her family to document their daily life and the challenges they face since fleeing the war in their country. I'm a founder of the foundation, where through photography we manage to make a difference. For over a decade, I've been documenting the refugee crisis. Today, on the occasion of World Refugee Day, which is dedicated to raising awareness of the plight of refugees throughout the world, I'll be sharing images from Zahra's life. For more photos and videos of the refugee crisis, follow me . For more on how to get involved, follow . #MuhammedMuheisen #EverydayRefugees #WorldRefugeeDay
natgeo
Photo by Muhammed Muheisen / Zahra Mahmoud, a young Syrian refugee, lives with her family in a tented settlement in Jordan. Since 2015, I've been visiting Zahra and her family to document her daily life and the challenges they face. Here we see Zahra through the years, growing up in front of my lens. Due to the pandemic, I couldn’t travel to see Zahra and her family during a planned April 2020 trip, however we managed to connect through a video call. Today, on the occasion of World Refugee Day, which is dedicated to raising awareness of the plight of refugees throughout the world, I'll be sharing images of Zahra. It’s never just a picture; it’s a voice, a testimony, a message that lives forever. I'm a founder of the Foundation, where through photography we manage to make a difference. For over a decade, I have been documenting the refugee crisis. For more photos and videos of the refugee crisis, follow me . For more on how to get involved, follow . #Muhammedmuheisen #EverydayRefugees #WorldRefugeeDay
natgeo
Photo by Muhammed Muheisen / Since 2015 I have been visiting Zahra and her family—Syrian refugees—to document her daily life and the challenges they face. Unfortunately nothing changed in her life in that time, so I made it my mission and commitment to keep telling her story. There is hope out there, and we should never stop believing. Here Zahra sits outside her family’s tent. I'm a photojournalist and founder of the Foundation, where through photography we manage to make a difference. For over a decade, I have been documenting the refugee crisis. Today, on the occasion of World Refugee Day—dedicated to raising awareness of the plight of refugees throughout the world—I'll be sharing images of Zahra. For more photos and videos of the refugee crisis, follow me . For more on how to get involved, follow . #muhammedmuheisen #everydayrefugees #worldrefugeeday
natgeo
Photo by / I started photographing the night sky in the early 1990s, in high school. Digital cameras became part of my gear in the early 2000s; by 2007, when I was still living in Iran, I had switched over. This simple 20-second exposure photograph was the main reason. On this freezing but crystal-clear January night, light from a first quarter moon illuminated this dreamlike landscape of the rugged, snow-covered peaks of the Alborz Mountains, a couple of hours from Tehran (the glow on the right). Can you spot Orion and Sirius in the sky? The yellow-tinged Betelgeuse, on the shoulder of Orion, is at the top right. Sirius, the brightest star in our sky, stands above the center. The eerie glow along the Haraz Valley, in the foreground, is the light from cars traveling on a highway. Over the years I have contributed many images to the highly popular NASA educational page, and this image was the first one. Explore the night sky with me . #twanight #orion #nightsky #alborz
natgeo
Photo by Danielle Villasana / People gather in Yerevan’s Republic Square in Armenia a few months after the country’s 2018 "velvet" revolution. As a result of Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan’s resignation, a snap election—tied to the country’s security in the wake of the loss of Nagorno-Karabakh—has been called. A territory located in Azerbaijan with a majority Armenian population, Nagorno-Karabakh was regained by Azerbaijan, with Armenia returning occupied territories late last year. As border tensions between the two countries heighten, Armenians will soon head to the polls on June 20. Follow me for more images of daily life around the world.
natgeo
Photo by / Can Mata is the largest active landfill in the Catalonia region of Spain, and it keeps getting bigger. Fed up with the smell and noise, many locals want it closed. But each expansion offers paleontologists access to fossils deep underground that would otherwise be out of reach. The soil at Can Mata holds fascinating fossils from about 11.2 million to 12.5 million years ago, including species of ancient primates found nowhere else in the world. Paleontologists have been monitoring the dump’s expansion since 2002. For more on this story, please see the July issue of National Geographic magazine and check out Nat Geo's link in bio. Follow for more photos and stories.
natgeo
Photo by Luján Agusti / In 2018 I had the opportunity to travel along part of the border between Mexico and the United States. It's a complex place but also one where magical things happen. There I experienced Juneteenth celebrations with the Mascogos in El Nacimiento de los Negros, their town whose name translates literally as "Birth of the Blacks." Descendants of Black Seminoles, the Mascogos fled to Mexico to escape slavery and discrimination in the United States. The Mexican government admitted them in exchange for their forming an army to protect the frontier. They were offered land, livestock, and Mexican nationality. By the end of 1851, they had settled in the area now known as El Nacimiento de los Negros, half an hour from the city of Múzquiz, in northern Mexico. Currently, around 70 families live in El Nacimiento and are dedicated to agriculture (beans, corn, and wheat) and to breeding cattle and goats. They are known to be excellent riders. On June 19, they celebrate Juneteenth to commemorate when slavery was abolished in the neighboring Texas. On that day the whole town, dressed in their most elegant clothes and accompanied by their horses, turns out to dance, feast, and celebrate their roots. Follow me at to learn more about this and other stories. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story. #Mascogos #Juneteenth
natgeo
Photo by / Flying over the Valle del Lupo in Calabria, Italy, where hundreds of wind turbines have been installed in a wooded valley to create renewable energy. This syncretism between nature and technology, the well-being of man and the planet, are the central themes humanity must confront in the coming decades in order to fight the climate crisis of the 21st century. As a photographer I take care in documenting this massive transition in order to offer others imagery about our future. Please follow me to know more about possible solutions. #future #environment #futurestudies #climatechange
natgeo
Photo by / The skull of a false saber-toothed cat is cradled by head conservator Xènia Aymerich of the Miquel Crusafont Catalan Institute of Paleontology. It’s one of more than 70,000 fossils found at the Abocador de Can Mata, a landfill near Barcelona that’s a paleontologists’ paradise. Can Mata is the largest active landfill in the Catalonia region of Spain, and it keeps getting bigger. Fed up with the smell and noise, many locals want it closed. But each expansion offers paleontologists access to fossils deep underground that would otherwise be out of reach. For more on the story, check out Nat Geo's July issue and link in bio. Follow for more photos and stories.
natgeo
Photo by Keith Ladzinski / A lone road cuts a clean line across Bolivia's Uyuni Salt Flats. This area is the largest salt flat on Earth, roughly 4,000 square miles (10,000 sq km), perched at an altitude of 12,000 feet (3,600m). Although it's mercilessly hot and dry, it's an unforgettable sight to see.
natgeo
Photo by / A severe drought in the western United States has taken hold again. I worked on two drought stories: in 2013 in Oklahoma (image two), visiting the site of the famous Dust Bowl images from the 1930s, and then in 2014 in the Central Valley of California (first image), where sheep farmers and other agricultural operations were severely hurting. I can only imagine how it must be now, as yet another once-in-a-lifetime drought is gripping the West in America. #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #AmericanDrought #California #Oklahoma